The Board Blazers Blog


Back to School Guide for Skaters

It’s that time again! The smell of freshly sharpened pencils is in the air, and the last vestiges of summer freedom are passing away - it’s Back To School Season! It’s easy to get stressed and stymied with back to school shopping, so we’re here today to help you check off your list from the comfort of your seat. This one-stop shop for skaters going back to school should have you prepped and ready to shred (and study)! We’ve compiled all of our favorite gear to set your skater up for schoolyard and classroom success. From safety gear to clothing, book covers and pencil cases to tech accessories – we’ve got you covered. So sit back, relax, and check off your back to school shopping list one click at a time!


You can’t go to school without a way to carry your books AND your board! Two of our very favorite brands have killer backpacks that will not only tote your school books but your skateboard too. First up, our all-time favorite skate backpack, the Dakine Atlas. Man, this bag is such a workhorse! Known for quality, and sleek modern design, you straight can’t go wrong with this bag. With a little care, it could serve you for a few years – it’s built to last! But lately, we’ve been rather taken with this second option, the Vans Jetter Carry All. The pop of red and the slightly larger size have us rethinking our backpack loyalties. Either of these bags is an excellent choice and will serve your skater well!


Skateboarding is crazy fun, but you've got to be prepared with the correct safety gear. If your student is skating to school (can't decide if they’re ready? We can help!), you're going to need something to keep that noggin safe! We always recommend the JBM Skateboard Helmet for its high customer satisfaction, availability of colors and styles, and long-term durability. It’s a classic look that will carry your skater through many years of school. Looks fresh, great investment, win-win! Similarly, a fly pair of knee pads (yes, they can be cool!) will keep those knees so fresh and so clean (clean). We’re digging the 187 Killer Pads. The white on black contrast is a statement maker. If you’re going to cover their knees, they might as well look sick doing it, and the 187s are a sure fire way to do it!

You can’t back to school shop without picking up some sick duds for your skater. And while we probably can’t save you from that dreaded (or maybe enjoyable?) trip to Target or Old Navy, we can help you out with a few items. Any skater who is anyone has a legit HUF hoodie, and this one is CLASSIC. Your skater will earn instant street cred with his crew when he sports this HUF box logo hoodie. Stay warm and look sick! And no skater should be without a pair of classic Thrasher skate socks. If you’ve got a skater in the house, then you’re probably already familiar with the mid-calf socks so iconic to the sport. But if you haven’t yet done so, spring for at least a two pack of the real deal. Thrasher socks are indispensable style statements in the skating world. Give your skater a leg up with his crew for under $20. You'll be glad you did.

Got a skater with a smartphone? Skip the overtly “skateboardy” phone covers and go for this understated phone case made of recycled skate decks. Each one is unique, and while it can’t keep your student from texting in class, it will keep him on the edge of style!

Now, what would a Back To School guide be without school supplies? Look no further, folks! First up we have this ultra-rad set of 2 pocket folders. With many schools now requiring you to purchase your own classroom supplies, keep your shredder stocked in skateboard style with TEN 2 pocket folders for each subject. You can’t be over prepared! Need composition notebooks? Why settle for the old black and white marbled pattern, when you could have black on blue skater silhouettes! Most classes will require a notebook or journal of some kind, and these will set your skater apart. With 100 pages of lined paper, students can fill the pages with brain food, while still repping their love of the shred. Have a kiddo who is tough on the textbooks? Keep their school gear in mint condition with The Original Book Sox in skateboard motif! These stretchy nylon book covers will expand to fit textbooks of nearly any size, keeping them from bumps and bruises and they travel from locker to classroom to home and back again. And for even further customization of school supplies, we recommend this 100 pack of skateboard stickers. They aren’t just for boards! Your student can customize their supplies with these rad stickers, covering their notebooks, binders, pencil cases – you name it!

 

Speaking of pencils and cases, here are a few that we dig! The Inkology pencil pouch will fit snugly inside a three-ring binder and keep all those writing implements corralled... until they disappear as they always do. If your skater isn’t much for binders, the navy blue BHRETI pencil case stows easily inside a backpack. With a slim design and a sweet skateboarding patch attached, it’s sure to please. Preempt the running-out-of-eraser problem by picking up a few of these super fun two-pack of rubber skateboard erasers. They’ll never peeve their teacher by scratching out an answer when they should have erased, and they’ll enjoy erasing that much more when they’re reminded of their favorite pastime. And how cool is this design? These little skateboard erasers actually roll! 

 

All work and no play makes Johnny a dull (and miserable) boy. While you’re grabbing school supplies, why not nab a few small things to keep the summer fun alive while taking those needed study breaks? For lunchtime at school or a homework break, The People’s Republic fingerboard will let them enjoy skateboarding, but with no need for the full sized board! Mastering the art of the skate fingerboard will entertain for hours and remind them of their love of the real deal. Once the sun has set, and the homework is packed away for the night, head out for a fun shred session with a new set of Board Blazers! These LED underglow lights attach easily to the underside of your skate deck and provide hours of skateboarding fun in style and safety. Keep their shred sessions LIT with board Blazers!

But what if it’s time for a new board entirely? A new set of wheels doesn’t just mean a car, you know! If you’re looking for a new all-inclusive skateboard package, the Minority 32 inch maple board is a great option. With sick deck artwork and a solid setup, your skater will be glad to have this in his arsenal. Want to help your skater branch out? Consider a Penny Board! These short boards (a solid 10+ inches shorter than a standard board) are entirely acrylic, come in WILD colors, and will give your skater something new to master! Shortboards are easier to tote and will make certain tricks and flips easier to accomplish. At a super accessible price point, a Penny board will give your skater a new challenge. If shortboards aren’t their style, consider a longboard! This Ten Toes Bamboo Longboard will introduce them to the wide world of longboarding. Cruising, dancing, downhill, the forms of longboarding are endless and will provide your skater with access to an entirely new sector of the sport. Longboards are also ideal for commuting since skaters don’t have to pump their feet as often to maintain speed. For extra points and portability, consider investing in a Board Up Foldable Longboard! It folds in half when not in use and will easily slip into a backpack or locker. If you have a student who plans on skating to school, this will make a killer surprise!

Back to school doesn’t have to be stressful for you and lame for your student. This skate gear will remind them that while school feels long, they can head home to their favorite hobby as soon as that last bell rings. Now go out, complete your school supply shopping and get back home to those last summer shred sessions!


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Skateboarding to School

You’ve seen plenty of kids biking and walking to school, so why not skateboard? Alternative forms of transportation are great for the environment, and they get the heart pumping! But before you ditch the car or the bus, there are a few things to consider. Is your child ready to ride all the way to school? This question is especially fraught if your kiddo’s commute to the classroom is solo. Allowing your child to go anywhere unsupervised is an enormous decision, and deeply personal. But today we hope to help ease that decision-making burden and shed some light on how to tell if and when your child is ready to ride their skateboard to school and potentially alone. As is always the case with matters of safety, we urge you to listen to your gut and use common sense to make the safest decision for your family. Now let’s jump right in…

Skateboarding to school brings many advantages over biking. One of the largest is that the opportunity for theft diminishes significantly since your child can likely bring his or her board into their classroom or store the board in their locker. On the whole, bikes are far more likely to be stolen than skateboards, so choosing to opt for the board better protects your investment! Not just a sound investment, skateboards can also increase your student's style amongst their peers (all the cool kids are doing it, mom!), especially when their board is outfitted with the sickest accessories! And ultimately, concerning safety, many parents prefer skateboards to bikes for school transportation since bikes are relegated to the street, and skateboards are better for the sidewalks. This increases the distance from car traffic to your child, making them inherently safer.

And while we are all thrilled about skateboarding being safer, there are still many factors to consider when deciding on a commute. How can you know when a child is ready to use a board to commute to school? If the child is traveling with you, your main concerns will be the child listening to you, and whether the child is physically capable of pushing the board all the way to and from school while wearing his or her backpack. Try taking a few practice walks together. Does your kiddo quickly tire of the board and ask to walk or be carried? Do they listen when you ask them to stop or slow down? A child who is ready to board to school should enjoy longer jaunts on their skateboard and listen attentively when they are given instructions, particularly when car and pedestrian traffic is involved.

But what about determining when your child is ready to commute to school alone? As we mentioned, this is highly personal, and this article isn’t meant to be prescriptive. But we will offer you a few strategies to help your family make the best decision. First, you should be sure that your child knows the necessary traffic and safety rules. Looking both ways before you cross the street is a great start, but traffic safety is much more complicated. Your child should be well versed in the standard hand signals (turning left, turning right, stopping, slowing down, etc.) as well as knowledge of traffic patterns. Skaters should always ride with traffic – never against it! Anyone who walks or rides on a heavily trafficked street should also have respect for vehicle traffic and always assume a vehicle will not be looking for them on the sidewalk. A child who is cavalier about car traffic is not ready for this freedom.

You will also want to determine the best and safest route for your child to travel while commuting. Just because the route is shortest does not make it the best. When choosing their route you should consider the following:

  • How many times will your child cross a minor or major street? 
  • How heavily trafficked are the streets along the route? 
  • Are crossing guards are available?
  • Is the sidewalk wide enough and in decent condition?
  • What is the total distance your child will travel?
  • Should your child become hurt or afraid, are there ample resources around for help?


Finally, you will want to asses your child’s personal level of responsibility. This is inherently hard to quantify, but when your child travels alone, he or she should have a healthy respect for and skepticism of unknown people and situations. You may want to use the following questions as a guideline for determining responsibility and safety readiness (often called the Test of Twelve):

1. Does your child know how to honor his feelings? If someone makes him uncomfortable, that's an important signal.
2. Are you as the parent strong enough to hear about any experience your child has had, no matter how unpleasant?
3. Does your child know it's okay to rebuff and defy adults?
4. Does your child know it's okay to be assertive?
5. Does your child know how to ask for assistance or help?
6. Does your child know how to choose who to ask? For example, he should look for a woman with children to help him.
7. Does your child know how to describe his peril?
8. Does your child know it's okay to strike, even to injure, someone if he believes he is in danger, and that you'll support any action he takes as a result of feeling uncomfortable or afraid?
9. Does your child know it's okay to make noise, to scream, to yell, to run?
10. Does your child know that if someone ever tries to force him to go somewhere, what he yells should include, ''This is not my father''? Onlookers seeing a child yell or even struggle are likely to assume the adult is a parent.
11. Does your child know that if someone says, ''Don't yell,'' the thing to do is yell? The corollary is if someone says, ''Don't tell,'' the thing to do is tell.
12. Does your child know to fully resist ever going anywhere out of public view with someone he doesn't know, and particularly to resist going anywhere with someone who tries to persuade him?

While these are decidedly unpleasant things to dwell upon, they are essential qualities to assess. While your child will hopefully not encounter anything sinister on their commute, readiness is necessary in case the situation ever arises.

Whenever you determine that your child is capable of commuting to school solo, we always recommend a cell phone, if only for emergencies. If you live close to your child’s school in a heavily residential area, you may be able to send them to school solo at a younger age versus a dense urban area. Whatever the case, take the time to make an informed decision that fits your particular family.

Skateboarding to school brings incredible freedom and fun for your child! Suddenly meeting up with friends before or after school becomes more accessible. Commuting becomes less like a chore and something to actually look forward to. Whenever your child is ready, we can’t recommend it highly enough! If you find yourself needing recommendations for skate gear (think safety, moms and dads!) head over here for our very top picks!


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Skateboard Shops: Know Before You Go!

Is it time for new wheels? Want to buy a board for yourself (or someone else) for the first time? Are you grabbing a few copies of the latest Transworld Skateboarding magazine? Head to your nearest skate shop! Whether you’re a regular around there or a complete newbie, it’s best to be prepared before you go, and we’re here today to help!


First, you’re going to need to find a skate shop, if you don’t have one to which you’re already loyal. While Googling “skate shops near me” will definitely return results, we’d suggest you try Yelp.com if you haven’t already. It's a business search engine that allows you to narrow your search area by adjusting the map and then will return results to you based upon ratings and reviews by other users. And when it comes to skate shops, you want a good honest place. People are vocal about great stores, so trust the masses to help you find a killer business. Start by searching for “skateboard shop” with the area being the city or town where you live, and then go from there.


You’re likely to come up with loads of results ranging from the usual sporting goods stores (think the kind that also sells canoes, tents, and basketballs), to hardware stores (believe it or not, some do sell skateboards!), to colossal skate/punk retailers like Zumiez and PacSun. Amidst all of these choices, you will find a few diamonds in the rough – the local skate store owned and staffed by lovers of all things skateboarding. THAT is the place you want to go. While the other stores are satisfactory in their own right, a genuine skateboard shop will offer you the best experience and all of the benefits we are about to share with you.


Once you’ve got a place in mind (or maybe you’ve already got a great storefront you love!), here are a few things to remember. Firstly, you’ll want to have some idea of why you’re there, even if you know it's only to browse. Staff at great stores will offer to help you as soon as you arrive, and knowing what you want, even some small idea of what you might want is super helpful to the salesperson.


Let’s take a quick minute here and make a point that might seem obvious: Don’t try to impress the salesperson. Be honest about your knowledge of products or lack thereof. One of the worst things you can do is walk in and try to look cool or educated to the staff. There’s no need to impress anyone; if you’re looking to buy a board for your nephew or granddaughter and you know nothing about skating, say so! They won’t judge you, in fact, they will be of MORE help to you because they will know the right questions to ask as a follow-up. If you over or undersell your knowledge and skating ability, you might walk out of the store with the absolute wrong product, and that’s a bummer for no one but you, my friend. In our experience, the staffers at local skate outfits are very kind and not judgmental, so speak freely about your level of knowledge and skill.


The salespeople at these stores are basically like professors at a mini-skateboard university. Selling skate gear is what they do with their life, and they know a TON about it. We recommend asking as many questions as you can and then actively listening to the answers. Unless they say something totally off-the-wall (hasn't happened to us yet), trust their advice. It's their job, and they know what’s up. Let’s say you walk in hoping to buy a specific skateboard and based on your skills the salesperson recommends against it, listen up. Odds are they know what they’re talking about and you might be way happier shredding on a different piece of equipment. Look at it as an opportunity to build relationships with some of the most knowledgeable skaters in your area. The employees are a treasure trove of info. They should be your first ask when you’re looking for gear, recommendations, spots to skate, insider tips – anything!


Lots of people walk into a skate shop looking to buy a skateboard, either for themselves or someone else. If that’s you, RAD!! We are stoked you want to start skating, or continue shredding with a new setup! If you hit up your local skate shop you’re definitely in the right place, but be advised, you might not leave the shop with a skateboard that same day. Chat with the salespeople and get their advice. Choosing a board can be difficult (if you want to simplify the process, see our How-To here!), and it can be deeply personal. Don’t be disappointed if you leave without a board or need to gather some follow-up info before settling on your purchase. You’ll be glad you put in the effort and eventually ended up with the perfect product!


Although you might think that all skateboards are created equal (especially if you’re not a skater), it’s important to be committed to purchasing the correct gear for yourself or someone else. The right equipment can make all the difference in your experience of the sport! If you aren’t sure, and you NEED to make a purchase that day (I’m looking at you, dads shopping on Christmas Eve, ha!), we suggest a gift card and some skate stickers. Any skater will flip (pun intended) for money to spend on skateboarding gear, and skate stickers are always sick. Sometimes your local shop will toss some your way for free! And if you want to make the gift extra legit, throw in a set of Board Blazers - they'll elevate anyone's night skate experience for sure!


Getting to know your local skate shop is a great experience, and knowing what you need and what to expect before you head out the door will enhance your experience. So what are your favorite local haunts? Hit us up on Instagram @BoardBlazers and let us know! We blaze all over, and who knows? You might just run into us at your killer local skate shop next time you’re there!


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5 Skateboarding Tricks You Can Learn In ONE DAY!

You read that right! Want to master a trick or two or FIVE in a day? We’re bringing you a full line up of just those sorts of moves. If you have a board and know how to push, get ready because you're about to be prepared to show off your skillz at the skate park (or at least to the kids down the block). If you’re looking for directions for how to ollie or kickflip within a day, we hate to burst your bubble, but those tricks take a while to master, and you shouldn’t expect them to come to you immediately. BUT! Skating is all about making progress, and these five tricks will make you feel like you’re progressing toward skating greatness – and you are!

We’re linking a bunch of videos here by Braille Skateboarding, which if you aren’t familiar with them, GO WATCH AND SUBSCRIBE. They’re a seriously impressive group of skaters whose sole purpose is to get more people to try and love skating. They are the hands-down best pick for skateboarding tutorials from beginner level right up through expert. Skaters and shredders, we are proud to present: ONE DAY SKATE TRICKS!

1. Flip Jump Mount

While you could argue that this isn't exactly a "trick," boy will you look baller if you mount your board like this in front of your homies. As Aaron mentions in the video, it might be best to practice this trick on grass or carpet first so that you can get the hang of the jumping part and add in the balancing step later. Start with your board, deck side up, placed over the tops of your feet. Make sure your feet are situated right beneath the trucks for optimal balance. With confidence, take a big hop into the air, flipping your board onto its wheels and landing with your feet firmly planted on the grip tape. While you might not land this on the first try, we're willing to bet you can master it within 10 minutes. Believe us, we tried with a clutzy staffer in a grassy yard - if she can do it, you can! Once you've mastered the flip jump mount in the grass, try it on the sidewalk. It'll take a few more tries, and perhaps a bruise or two, but you'll definitely have this one in the bag within a day! We should also add that this looks majorly rad done at night with a set of Board Blazers

2. Nosebleed

The only prior skill you need for this trick is to know how to push your board along. If you can push, then you can learn to nosebleed, which will naturally grow into a noseslide, and how sick will that be?! You will first want to find the right kind of curb. As you can see in the clip above, a squared-off curb is what you're looking for when you choose your location. Skip any of the curbs with rolls and humps. Also, make sure you have plenty of space to roll directly at the curb. Once you've found an ideal spot, start by slowly pushing along headed straight toward the curb. When you're just about to run directly into the curb (try this slowly a time or two, if you're nervous!), shift your weight quickly to your back leg and pop up the front wheels. You should only need to pop them an inch or two at most to give the nose of your board the room it needs to rock onto the top of the curb. Once you feel your board stop moving as it hits the curb, gently shift your weight onto your front foot and rock the board into the air. To finish, shift your weight back again and roll off and away from the curb with your rear foot now in the lead.

Honestly, the hardest part about learning this trick (and to be fair, most tricks!) is to have the confidence to pop the board like you mean it. And the second hardest part will be combining all of those steps into a fluid motion. But we definitely believe its simple enough to master in under an hour. Go try!

3. Caveman

The Caveman builds off of the skills you learned on the Flip Jump Mount, and it builds toward the skills you'll need for our fifth and final trick, so definitely don't skip this one! Since you are already confident about jumping onto the board, this is just a slight variation. You will want to start with the board in your hand (the same hand as your lead foot) and your feet shoulder-width apart. Slowly drop your board directly in front of you, while you take a small hop into the air. The goal is for your feet to hit the board at the same time your board's wheels are hitting the ground. This is another move that works well when practiced first in a grassy area or on carpeting. This will allow you to focus on timing the drop of your board and your jump. Once you've got that mastered, move to the sidewalk and work on your balance as you stick the landing. With your skills from before, this is definitely a one-afternoon (or less!) trick!

4. Ride Off Curb

 

Braille Skateboarding has an entire tutorial video about this one move, so definitely go give that a watch at some point! The first and most basic step for this trick is being able to roll along smoothly and confidently while holding up the front end of your board, meaning you're moving along the sidewalk with only the back two wheels on the ground. Give yourself a good amount of time to get that fully mastered before moving on. If you can lift your board high enough to ride over a crack, then you're ready. 

When you roll off a curb, you want to keep your board level as you and the board drop off the edge. By popping your front wheels up ever so slightly, you will resist the urge to follow gravity and force all of your weight down onto your front foot as you roll off. If you do this, you'll know right away, because the nose of your board will jut into the ground and your forward momentum will throw you off. If you pop up just enough, you should roll smoothly off the curve, be airborne for a split second, and then land solidly on all four wheels. Once you've landed this, then you just roll away like it's nothing. The major skills at play here are the ability to pop your board (like we mentioned earlier), the confidence to land on your board on all four wheels (similar to the Caveman move), and then the balance to stick the landing and roll away. If you've mastered the three previous tricks, this one won't be too much of a stretch for you! 

5. 5-Finger Boneless

 

Now there are tons of boneless moves out there. Boneless basically means that your hand is on the board while you are performing the trick. Boneless moves are great for beginners because you're always in contact with the board with either your feet or a hand - you have total control. 

For this particular boneless move, push forward as normal. Then, while rolling, reach down and grab the front middle of your board with your rear hand. Step off the board with your front foot, lift up the board with your rear hand while keeping your rear foot on the board. Then, release your hand, allowing your board to drop back to the ground, all while keeping your rear foot in contact with the board. You want to jump your front foot back on the board at the exact moment when all four wheels hit the ground. Then you sail away like it was nothing! This move is much less "scary" in that you don't ever fully lose contact with the board or the ground, but it can take a while to make the motion fluid enough that it looks smooth. With an afternoon to tackle it though, we have confidence that you'll master it! 

So, ready to get out and shred? We challenge you to commit just an hour or two to a few of these tricks. We bet you'll walk away with new skills, a new confidence, and fall in love just a little bit more with skateboarding. 
Are you looking for even more skate trick tutorials? Check out our article on 10 Easy Skateboard Tricks and level up your game yet again! Don't forget to hit us up on Instagram @BoardBlazers. Tag us in your progress videos! And with that, it's time to walk away from the screen, grab your board, and give these five tricks a try!


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How to Teach Your Kid to Ride a Scooter

Zooming down the street on a scooter can be one of your child’s first tastes of big kid freedom! Like a skateboard with handlebars, kick scooters are a great way to get outdoors and enjoy your neighborhood. And even though adults may jump onto a scooter and zoom away without thinking, there’s actually a lot of skill that goes into learning to ride one. Today we’ll outline everything you need to know about teaching your kiddo (or maybe yourself!) to ride a kick scooter.

As with any new skill, it’s important to put safety first. Make sure any new rider is equipped with the proper gear: a well fitting helmet, knee pads, wrist guards, and a set of Board Blazers – you never know when you’ll need the extra light! Once you’re all suited up and scooter in hand, you’re ready to head outside!

The first thing to determine for any scooter rider is their dominant foot. Like handedness, the majority of people are right foot dominant, giving this the name “regular stance.” However there are still many people in the world that are left foot dominant, or “goofy footed.” Despite the name, there’s nothing abnormal about being left-foot dominant; it’s just less common. There are many ways to determine your child’s footedness, and we’ll describe two of them here. First, try having your child stand with both feet about shoulder width apart on the flat ground. Then have them slowly lean forward as if falling, until they suddenly put one foot out to catch themselves. The foot they use to stop their fall is their dominant foot. If that sounds a bit scary for your child, simply have them stand at the bottom of a flight of stairs with both feet flat on the ground. Then ask them to walk up the stairs. The foot the child chooses to place atop the first step is likely their dominant foot. While this test is sometimes slightly less accurate than the “falling” test, it’s also less scary for some children.

Once you’ve determined your child’s footedness, it’s important to teach them that their strong foot (whichever one caught them while falling or was placed atop the bottom stair first) should always be BEHIND their less dominant foot. Their strong foot will be the pushing foot, and their weaker foot will remain on the scooter.

The scooter should also be set up accurately for your child’s height. Most kick scooters will have adjustable handlebars, and it’s important to set these at an appropriate height for both rider comfort and safety. While balancing the scooter for your child, have them stand flat-footed on the deck with proper outdoor sports shoes. Then adjust the height of the handlebars to fall somewhere between their hip height and waist height. We recommend closer to waist height for beginners. While it can be tempting for many kiddos to want the handlebars higher than their waist, discourage them from this option. Handlebars that are too high will cause them to lose control of the scooter. Waist height is a perfect setting for a beginner.


It’s finally time to get up on that scooter and… scoot! Ensure that your child has ample open space on a flat paved area. If you’re not sure where to find this, try a school parking lot on the weekends, or a basketball court at a nearby park – both of these are great options for paved open areas! Once you’re all set, have your child straddle the scooter with hands on the handlebars and both feet on the ground. Then, have them place their non-dominant foot on the scooter while keeping their dominant foot on the ground. This will ease them into basic scooter balance. Once they are confident in balancing the scooter while it is stationary, it’s time to introduce movement. While standing nearby to offer assistance if needed, ask your child to use their dominant foot to push forward a bit, pick up his or her foot and then set it back down. Basically, you’re asking your child to walk with the help of the scooter: stand, push, glide, step back down, stand, push, glide, step back down, etc. This may come naturally to some kids, and that’s great! But don’t worry if this stage lasts a while for your child, or finds both of you frustrated. Remember that this should be fun! If you or your child is feeling stressed, walk away and come back later.

These slow step & glide motions will naturally progress into quicker steps and longer glides. Eventually, encourage your child to place his dominant foot (the pushing foot) on the scooter behind his lead foot. Challenge your child to see how long he or she can glide with both feet on the scooter deck. Congratulations! You now have a proficient scooter kid in the house!


A word about brakes:


Different scooters employ different braking systems. A fair few have hand brakes (operated on the handlebars), most have foot brakes (a push-down contraption on the rear wheel), and some have no brakes (the classic drag-your-shoe method). It’s essential for your child to know how to apply the brakes and also to be capable of doing so. Hand brakes require that your child is strong enough to apply them, and usually requires some extra practice. Often a scooter is a child’s first experience using hand brakes, which can be confusing to little minds. “I push with my foot and stop with my hand?” is a reasonably befuddling new skill until your scooter rider gets enough practice. Foot brakes are more intuitive, but require a good sense of balance, since you must apply the brake mid-glide with your dominant foot. Also be SURE to always wear proper shoes with scooters that have foot breaks. The friction between the wheel and the brake creates an enormous amount of heat that will easily transfer to your child’s foot. Wear good shoes, and absolutely NO scooting barefoot!


Any child that’s old enough to walk and run is old enough to ride a scooter with proper supervision. Learning to scoot can be an excellent way for little ones to be active with the family. And let's face it, scooting is fun at any age! So grab your kiddo, your scooter, and your safety gear and get outside – an entire world of scooting possibility awaits!


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